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Pond Plants in the Fall

Pond Plants in the Fall
Pond Plants in the Fall

What do you with Pond Plants in the Fall?

How do you handle Pond Plants in the Fall?  Here on the east coast, the seasonal change from summer to fall is apparent by the beautiful, multi-colored leaves and the dip toward cooler temperatures. How will that chill you feel in the air affect the plants in your aquatic paradise?

Hardy Marginals

 As with terrestrial, perennial plants, dropping temperatures signal your hardy aquatic plants to prepare for their winter dormancy. At this time, you should stop fertilizing them as you see leaves begin to yellow and brown. It’s OK to leave these plants where they are in your pond to weather the cold of winter, just be sure to trim the dying foliage of your marginal plants down to 2” above the water level.

Tropical Marginals

Treat these plants as they would any garden annual by replacing them each season. A fun alternative to this is to treat them as tropical houseplants and bring them in for the winter. Most tropical marginals will do well potted in heavy garden soil in a sealed clay pot with no drainage holes. When kept wet, the plants do well in a sunny window or sunroom.

Waterlilies

Waterlilies will also begin to show their dislike for the cold with yellowing leaves and fewer flowers. When this happens, the leaf and flower stems of hardy water lilies should be cut back to about 2 to 3” above the base of the plant.

In areas where freezing is likely, plants should be overwintered indoors. This can be a difficult task; therefore many gardeners choose to simply buy a new plant each season.

Lotus

As with the marginals in your pond, the foliage of your lotus plants will need to be trimmed back after they have died back and turned brown. It’s important not to cut the leaves while they are still green because the freshly cut, hollow stems are susceptible to disease which can spread to the plant’s tuber, possibly killing the plant. Lotus tubers will not withstand freezing, so any plants that are growing in the shallow areas of your pond should be moved to the bottom, away from freezing water.

Caring for your Pond Plants in the Falll will mean less work and healthier plants come spring.  Contact us for more information on Pond Plants in the Fall.

clean pond water in six steps!

clean pond water
clean pond water

Six steps to clean pond water

Most pond owners know the importance  of clean pond water.  Not knowing how to get or keep clean pond water can be quite a challenge.  But we can help!  Follow the six tips below to help ensure clean pond water:

1. Maintain a healthy fish population

If you have more than 10” of fish for every 100 gallons of water, your pond is likely over-populated. Excessive fish waste can cause an imbalance in pond water. Consider finding some of them a new home.

2. Don’t over-feed your fish

When you feed fish more than they can eat, the uneaten food is left to decay in the pond. Be careful not to feed your fish more than once per day, and no more than they can eat in 2 to 3 minutes. Remove all excess, leftover food

3. Create a proper balance of plants

At season’s peak, you should have no more than 40% to 60% of the surface area of your pond either covered or shaded by plants. Too many plants can cause oxygen deficiencies at night due to the photosynthetic process, when the plants take in oxygen and give off carbon dioxide.

4. Choose the right size pump for your pond

You should be circulating the entire pond’s water volume a minimum of once every hour. Make sure your pump’s flow isn’t restricted by debris and be careful not to pump water higher than it was intended. Every pump has its flow limitations. Refer to the chart on the outside of the pump’s box to make sure you’re making the right choice for your pond.

5. Choose proper filtration for your pond 

Your filter should match the size of your pond. Remember, most manufacturers rate their filters based on ideal circumstances, and if you exceed those, your filter becomes less effective. Always up-size your filter so that it can handle more than the capacity of your pond. Also remember to clean your filter according to the manufacturer’s instructions.

6. Keep your clean pond water cool during the dog days of summer 

When clean pond water exceeds 75º Fahrenheit, it has a more difficult time retaining acceptable levels of dissolved oxygen. This is why it’s important to have your pond shaded by aquatic plants (see tip #3). Fish need oxygen to survive. If you see them at the pond’s surface gasping for air, add an aerator to help them during times of extreme heat.

 Contact us for more information about keeping your pond water clean.

 

 

Philadelphia pond help

Need Philadelphia pond help?  We are the company to call.  Here’s a recent video we had made that shows explains why you should hire AquaReale for your pond needs  Call us at 215.880.6811 with any questions.

How to plan a Philadelphia pond renovation

Philadelphia pond renovation
Philadelphia pond renovation

How to plan a Philadelphia pond renovation

Now that spring has FINALLY arrived, you are back outside and possibly thinking about what you want to do as a Philadelphia pond renovation.    If your pond or water feature is still in the dreaming and wishing stage, now’s a great time to start planning!

Some people view ponds as simply a part of their house, like an addition. When it is done, it’s done.  While this is true with some projects, a pond is always evolving and changing as a living organism.  Don’t be afraid to plan a Philadelphia pond renovation for your pond to make it what you want right now.

Maybe you want the water to go in a different direction or you want a blog filter.  Philadelphia pond renovations can also include a stream or waterfall addition or even a pondless waterfall in another part of your yard.  Ponds revision possibilities are endless!

What to do now?

Get your ideas on paper!  While your dreams and wishes are still fresh in your mind, it’s the perfect time to get your thoughts down.  How to start?  Let’s think about what you want and how you plan to use your pond. What does your perfect Philadelphia pond renovation look like?

Items to consider when planning your Philadelphia pond renovation:

  • What’s speaks to you when you’re out? A spring in the woods? A stream at the mountain?  A bubbling rock at the beach?  Once you know what you like, it’s easier to recreation these on a much smaller scale.
  • What do you enjoy most about water gardening – the plants, fish, frogs, turtles, birds, or terrestrial landscaping? Build your dream pond with that as your emphasis.
  • What do you like (or dislike) about your existing pond?
  • What places have you visited that look and feel “perfect” to you? A stream in the mountains?  A spring in the woods?  Recreate aspects of these places on a smaller scale.
  • Where do you spend most of your time when you’re at home?  Will you spend more time outside or inside?  Plan with that in mind.
  • What would make your yard a “paradise?”
  • Would you like to be able to swim with your fish in a natural swimming pond?

When you answer these questions, you’ll be well on your way to enhancing or creating your own aquatic paradise. AquaReale is here for all your pond needs—for everything from a Philadelphia pond renovation to a full pond installation. Reach out today to see how we can help make your dreams a reality.

How much is a Philadelphia pond cleaning?

 

Philadelphia pond cleaning
Philadelphia pond cleaning

Do you need a Philadelphia pond cleaning?

Do you need a Philadelphia pond cleaning?  Does your pond have green or murky water? Is the algae taking over?  Is there a buildup of sludge or mulch?  Are your fish being eaten or sick?

Ponds of all sizes need to be cleaned at least once a year.

How much is a Philadelphia pond cleaning?

We get asked that a lot.   The true answer is—it depends (we have average pricing listed at the bottom.) Pond cleanings are a vital part of the maintenance process.    The more time you wait between cleanouts, the more time, effort and money it will cost to clean.

The pond cleaning in Philadelphia cost depends on three main factors:

 

#1—The size of the pond.

#2—The condition of the pond

#3—How long it has been since your last cleanout.

#1:  Pond Size.

The larger the pond, the more expensive it will be to perform a Philadelphia pond cleaning.    Larger ponds also can be retention ponds or mud bottom ponds, which need to be dredged and have a whole different cleaning process. Most ponds run from between 8 x 8 feet to 11 x 16 feet.  Ponds can be much larger as well.  We work on smaller ponds as well, some as small as 2 by 2 feet.

#2: Pond Condition

Aside from size and regular maintenance, the overall condition of your pond will be an important factor in determining how much your Philadelphia pond cleaning will cost.  Certain physical characteristics of your pond can factor in as well, including the type of filtration and whether you have a bog, wetland or negative edge environment.

#3: Time since last cleaning

Pond cleaning prices also vary depending on when you last had maintenance on your pond.   The better a pond is maintained, the less work it will take to do a full clean out.

Anything cleaned longer than a year ago will be charged a higher price to account for the extra time and materials needed to clean the dirty pond.

 Philadelphia pond cleaning cost

Philadelphia pond cleanings start at $700 for an 8.5 x 11 pond that was cleaned the previous year and increase from there.  Most cleanings are in the $850 range.

No matter when you choose to do your clean up, the important thing is not to wait too long.

Remember, starting your water garden season with a clean slate will cut down on in season maintenance down the road.

Contact us to schedule your pond cleaning and start enjoying your pond or water feature today!

Main Line Fish Pond Aerator and Heater

 Main Line Fish Pond Aerator and Heater
Main Line Fish Pond Aerator and Heater

Do you need to install a Main Line Fish Pond Aerator and Heater?

Let me begin by saying if you don’t have fish in your water garden it is not necessary to install a Main Line Fish Pond Aerator and Heater. An argument can be made that one is more important than the other;  however, both can keep an area of the pond surface free from ice.

During the winter months your fish are still producing waste and CO2. Decomposition of the fish waste and any organic material during the winter produces harmful compounds that will rob the water of oxygen causing stress to the fish. If water toxicity levels get too high the fish could die.  When the pond is not frozen the gasses escape through the surface. Thus it is essential to keep an area in your pond free from ice. Both a fish pond deicer and a pond aerator pump have positive and negative points, so let’s take a closer look at both.

Main Line Fish Pond Aerator and Heater: De-Icer

 This is the easiest way to keep your pond free of ice. The electric pond heater is designed to heat the area around it, not the whole pond. It will not change the overall temperature of the pond water. Most electric pond heaters are thermostatically controlled therefore it can be plugged in and it will work. The negative side to heaters for a pond is if it gets really cold or windy the space around the fish pond water heater can freeze over creating a dome. It’s important to protect the fish pond heater from the wind, and if it gets really cold, check it often to see if it is frozen.

Main Line Fish Pond Aerator and Heater:What is Aeration?

The pond air stones do a good job of keeping a space open in the ice. Exactly what is pond aeration? A pond aeration system adds oxygen to the water column. As the air is moving through the water it allows the organic compounds that are in the water to attach and when the bubble hits the surface the gasses break apart releasing them safely into the atmosphere.

The negative to pond aerator pumps is the potential for the cool air to super cool the water. During winter months, keep the air stone a foot above the bottom of the pond keeping the warmer water just below the air.  If the air compressor is out in the cold air it is transferring that cold air to the pond water. This could cause the fish to die. Consider covering the winter pond aeration system with an insulated cover or put it in a heated building.

In winter, oxygen & gas exchange is crucial for the survival of your fish. If you don’t have a  Main Line Fish Pond Aerator and Heater yet, it’s not too late. Contact us today to get a pond aerator or a pond heater, your fish will thank you!

Philadelphia Indoor Pond Design

Philadelphia Indoor Pond
Philadelphia Indoor Pond

Do you have or want a Philadelphia Indoor Pond?

You can put a pond anywhere, especially if you have a Philadelphia Indoor Pond!  With winter here now, it’s time to think about a Philadelphia Indoor Pond.  Lots of people have indoor ponds– businesses, greenhouse owners and in actual homes.  We even built a pond in our client’s basement!

Indoor Pond Options

Indoor ponds can be extravagant and elaborate requiring significant space, planning and equipment or they can be very simple and easy to manage. Depending on the space you have available and the desired effect of the water feature, there are many options for type of water feature.

In large entries, foyers or atriums, large ponds or layered fountains may be appropriate.  In small office spaces, hallways and meeting rooms a simple wall or tabletop fountain may be enough. Water in indoor spaces has benefits regardless of the size.

Benefits of a Philadelphia Indoor Pond

A Philadelphia Indoor Pond does more than soothe the soul and well-being by making a contribution to interior spaces, that is both wonderfully aesthetic and to a significant extent, textural. With a little imagination, you can build an attractive and beauty pond that will be easy to maintain and add interest to the area where it’s built. The indoor aquatic pond combines the best features of an aquarium and an outdoor garden pond.

An indoor pond has more health benefits than you may realize. One benefit is the relaxing, calming effect of both the sight and sound of moving water. There are other psychological benefits like promoting calmness, focus, creativity and better sleep quality.

In addition, water, in all forms, releases negatively charged ions into the air, which combats free radicals and purifies the air of dust mites, pollen, germs, allergens and pollutants, and in turn keeps your body healthy. These negative ions are also believed to boost serotonin levels, which relieve stress and depression, and help to increase energy, alertness, and concentration.

During the winter months, low humidity in your home can become an issue, leading to worsening allergies, dry skin, static electricity and increased susceptibility to colds and flu. Indoor pond naturally add moisture to the room in which it is in. Not only is this beneficial for you and your family, it also is good for the plants in the room.

Where to put a Philadelphia Indoor Pond

An indoor pond could fit anywhere in your home, but there are obviously some rooms that are better suited than others. You can use them as art or sculpture in prominent spots, or place them in an area that would otherwise not be utilized such as underneath a staircase. No matter what type of water feature you choose, you are sure to reap all the benefits it provides for your home and family. Contact AquaReale for more information on maintenance or design of a Philadelphia Indoor Pond.

 

Main Line, PA Pond Plants

Pond Plants!

Main Line, PA Pond Plants
Main Line, PA Pond Plants

What to do you with your Main Line, PA Pond Plants in the fall? Falling leaves and cooler temperatures tell us that fall is here.  How will that chill in the air affect your pond plants?

Main Line, PA Pond Plants: Lotus

As with the marginals in your pond, the foliage of your lotus plants will need to be trimmed back after they have died back and turned brown. It’s important not to cut the leaves while they are still green because the freshly cut, hollow stems are susceptible to disease which can spread to the plant’s tuber, possibly killing the plant. Lotus tubers will not withstand freezing, so any plants that are growing in the shallow areas of your pond should be moved to the bottom, away from freezing water.

Main Line, PA Pond Plants: Hardy Marginals

As with terrestrial, perennial plants, dropping temperatures signal your hardy aquatic plants to prepare for their winter dormancy. At this time, you should stop fertilizing them as you see leaves begin to yellow and brown. It’s OK to leave these plants where they are in your pond to weather the cold of winter, just be sure to trim the dying foliage of your marginal plants down to 2” above the water level/  Most tropical marginals will do well potted in heavy garden soil in a sealed clay pot with no drainage holes. When kept wet, the plants do well in a sunny window or sunroom.

Main Line, PA Pond Plants: Waterlilies

Waterlilies will also begin to show their dislike for the cold with yellowing leaves and fewer flowers. When this happens, the leaf and flower stems of hardy water lilies should be cut back to about 2 to 3” above the base of the plant.

In areas where freezing is likely, plants should be overwintered indoors. This can be a difficult task; therefore, many gardeners choose to simply buy a new plant each season.

Caring for your Pond Plants in the fall will mean less work and healthier plants come spring.  Contact us for more information

 

10 Popular Philadelphia Pond Plants

Philadelphia Pond Plants
Philadelphia Pond Plants

10 Popular Philadelphia Pond Plants

Everyone has their favorite collection of Philadelphia Pond Plants , but there might be some varieties that you haven’t yet added to your water garden. We invite you to consider the following list of popular Philadelphia Pond Plants that make a welcome addition to any pond!

1. Creeping Jenny

Often used as a ground cover in terrestrial gardens, Creeping Jenny fares excellently when used in water gardening applications. Growing approximately 2 inches in height, it’s a great filler to soften edges of rocks.

2. Pickerel

Available in blue, white, and pink lavender spiked flowers, Pickerel is a great choice for Philadelphia Pond Plants with its shiny, green heart-shaped foliage. The blooms are long lasting and create a beautiful display when planted in masses.

3. Horsetail

Horsetail Reed provides a striking architectural presence in your pond with its segmented reeds, growing to 24″in height, while the dwarf version grows to 8″.  In the fall, cut the plant all the way down to the ground to keep the spores from spreading.

4. Taro

Several varieties of Taro are available for your pond and do well in full to part sunThis impressive, leafy water lover grows to about 48″ and always makes a striking appearance in the water garden.

5. Cardinal Flower

Plant this pretty flower along the shallow edges of your pond and watch the birds flock to it. Deep burgundy foliage sets off the vibrant red flowers. The leaves are up to 8″ long and the plant can grow as tall as three feet. -9.

6. Water Lettuce

Water Lettuce produces fuzzy, lime-green rosettes of leaves that look like little floating heads of lettuce. Super easy to grow, you simply let this plant float on the surface of the water with its roots dangling below.

7. Mosaic Plant

The beautiful Mosaic Plant consists of red and green diamond-shaped leaves in 3-6″ wide rosettes. In the summer, this floating plant produces sunny yellow cup-shaped flowers. Easy to grow, the plant provides a place for your finned friends to hide underneath.

8. Blue Iris

Many water gardeners enjoy the elegant splendor of the aquatic iris, which is among the first plants to bloom in the spring. Aquatic irises comprise such a large and diverse group – there are literally hundreds, if not thousands of cultivated and natural hybrids.

9. Sweet Flag

Also known as golden Japanese sweetflag (Acorus gramineus ‘Ogon’), these Philadelphia Pond Plants are ideal for containers and water gardens alike. It’s extremely flexible, as it can be grown with its toes in the water or partially submerged.

10. Waterlilies

Waterlilies are stunning creatures in the water garden and often the reason why many gardeners add a pond to their landscape. These beauties are characterized by amazing flowers representing all colors in the light spectrum … red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo and violet (including the collective white), and a number of shades in between.

 

Contact us to see which Philadelphia Pond Plants are best for you.

Philadelphia Swim Pond Master Build

Philadelphia Swim Pond
Swim Pond

As part of our recent advanced training at Pondomonium,  the pond industry’s largest trade event of the year,  AquaReale had the opportunity to help build a large Spectacular Swim Pond in Illinois.

The customers originally wanted a big pond their kids could play in, but the more they learned about Swim Ponds, the more interested they were.

They also had storm water issues which would be helped by the pond.  Downspouts were included as part of the system, which incorporated an overflow that drained into a drainage system.  This allows to the pond water to fluctuate by as many as 8 inches, allowing there to be an additional 8000-gallon storm water runoff into the pond before it overflows.

The Swim Pond is a 30 x 50 swim pond with a 20 x 20 wetland filter and a steam connecting the wetland filter to the pond, all getting drawn into a 15 x 15 intake skimmer bay.  In addition, the pond takes runoff from four properties, harvesting rainwater which leads to a bubbling rock in the front of the house.

The pond uses wetland filtration to filter a large body of water where people can swim and they can have fish as well as a clean body of water.  Instead of salt or chlorine, they use beneficial bacteria instead of harsh chemicals to keep the water clear

AquaReale recently built a Philadelphia Swim Pond, which was a conversion we did from a pool to a Swim Pond.  Contact us to see how we can help you get the Swim Pond/Recreational Pond of your dreams.

Call 215.880.6811 for more information.