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clean pond water in six steps!

clean pond water
clean pond water

Six steps to clean pond water

Most pond owners know the importance  of clean pond water.  Not knowing how to get or keep clean pond water can be quite a challenge.  But we can help!  Follow the six tips below to help ensure clean pond water:

1. Maintain a healthy fish population

If you have more than 10” of fish for every 100 gallons of water, your pond is likely over-populated. Excessive fish waste can cause an imbalance in pond water. Consider finding some of them a new home.

2. Don’t over-feed your fish

When you feed fish more than they can eat, the uneaten food is left to decay in the pond. Be careful not to feed your fish more than once per day, and no more than they can eat in 2 to 3 minutes. Remove all excess, leftover food

3. Create a proper balance of plants

At season’s peak, you should have no more than 40% to 60% of the surface area of your pond either covered or shaded by plants. Too many plants can cause oxygen deficiencies at night due to the photosynthetic process, when the plants take in oxygen and give off carbon dioxide.

4. Choose the right size pump for your pond

You should be circulating the entire pond’s water volume a minimum of once every hour. Make sure your pump’s flow isn’t restricted by debris and be careful not to pump water higher than it was intended. Every pump has its flow limitations. Refer to the chart on the outside of the pump’s box to make sure you’re making the right choice for your pond.

5. Choose proper filtration for your pond 

Your filter should match the size of your pond. Remember, most manufacturers rate their filters based on ideal circumstances, and if you exceed those, your filter becomes less effective. Always up-size your filter so that it can handle more than the capacity of your pond. Also remember to clean your filter according to the manufacturer’s instructions.

6. Keep your clean pond water cool during the dog days of summer 

When clean pond water exceeds 75º Fahrenheit, it has a more difficult time retaining acceptable levels of dissolved oxygen. This is why it’s important to have your pond shaded by aquatic plants (see tip #3). Fish need oxygen to survive. If you see them at the pond’s surface gasping for air, add an aerator to help them during times of extreme heat.

 Contact us for more information about keeping your pond water clean.

 

 

Philadelphia Spring Pond Cleaning

 

 Philadelphia Spring Pond Cleaning
Philadelphia Spring Pond Cleaning

Philadelphia Spring Pond Cleaning

So it’s spring time and you are wondering what maintenance is needed for your backyard pond.  Every pond is unique and will look different.  A few questions to start…  How do you want your pond to look?  Some people prefer pristine while others prefer a more rustic, natural look.

Spring is the best time to clean your pond or have your pond professionally cleaned.  A Philadelphia Spring Pond Cleaning will ensure your entire pond ecosystem is healthy and looking great for the months ahead.

We recommend full pond cleanings, whether we do it or you do it yourself.  A Philadelphia Spring Pond Cleaning full cleaning would involve storing the fish, draining the pond and power washing the rocks.  During this time, it’s easy to check for loose edges as well as check the pumps and filters for debris and any potential issues.  This is now a good time to cut back dead plant matter as well.

Philadelphia Spring Pond Filter Cleaning

If you greatly prefer the rustic look, you may prefer not to do a full Philadelphia Spring Pond Cleaning.  if that is the case, we recommend at least cleaning the filters and filter media.  It’s usually possible to clean the filters without draining down the pond.  However, without draining down the pond you won’t be able to do the other important things like cut back plants, check lights, make rock adjustments, etc.

If your pond does not have a filtration system, we highly recommend one.  Contact us to explore the possibility of adding one to your pond.

 

Ready to Enjoy to Pond

No matter what level of Philadelphia Spring Pond Cleaning pond you choose, a little pond maintenance in the springtime goes a long way to enjoying your backyard paradise in the warm months to come.  Contact us to see how AquaReale can get your pond up and running into the pond of your dreams.

Have you heard any koi pond myths?

Have you heard any Koi Pond Myths?

One of the biggest reasons many people get a water garden is so they can have fish.  Don’t let Koi Pond Myths keep you from getting a few of your own finned friends of your own! Here are some common myths with replies from Aquascape, Inc.
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Koi Pond Myths
Koi Pond Myths

Myth:

Aquascape Says:

“Fish will just create more pond maintenance.” Actually, fish are a crucial part of the ecosystem. Koi reduce algae by feeding on it, and they fertilize plants with their waste. So, fish actually create less pond maintenance.
“Koi cannot live in a pond with rocks and gravel.” Koi originated in nature, where rocks and gravel cover almost every pond on earth. We build rock and gravel lined ponds almost daily, which house perfectly healthy and happy Koi.
“I don’t want to lose all my fish to predators.” If constructed properly, one can virtually eliminate the risk of predators with a few simple precautionary techniques.
“Koi need at least three feet of water to survive.” 95% of the ponds that we build are two feet deep in the center, and the koi are happy and healthy as can be.
“I don’t want to be troubled with bringing my fish inside for the winter.” Koi are an extremely hardy fish, whose ancestors over-wintered in freezing conditions, and still do. Just keep the water circulating and maintain a hole in the ice and they’ll never know the difference.
“I don’t want to spend thousands of dollars on my fish.” Actually, pet quality koi start at $5.00 each with show quality koi going for one hundred thousand dollars or more. Since fish food is also very inexpensive, how much you want to spend on fish is your decision.
“You can’t have koi in a pond that has rocks and gravel” Koi are actually just a fancy variety of carp, and all carp are bottom feeders. They love to swim along the bottom and scavenge everything that is available on and in-between rocks. In nature, it’s not uncommon to find ponds, lakes, or rivers with rocks on the bottom.
Contact us for more information